Showing 101 Result(s)
2019 - 2020 Modern Volume 13

Winston Churchill: Challenging Perceptions of a British Hero

By Megan Bellamy Historical figures are ever-increasingly labelled as inherently ‘good’ or ‘evil’, as their entire characters, experiences and deeds are reduced to a singular narrative. This has never been more apparent than in the way we think about and commemorate Winston Churchill. Popular opinion celebrates him as a brilliant wartime hero, the saviour of …

2019 - 2020 Modern Volume 13

A Brief History of Whiteness in America: From Reconstruction to Trump’s Inauguration

By Shaye Mistry America has become a peculiar place in recent times. The once global hegemon was the centre of Western Liberalism and the forebearer of democracy. Yet, ongoing civil strife between legislature, institutions and the citizens themselves demonstrate another story. Much of the tense relationship between America’s multiculturalism and its minority white population is …

2019 - 2020 Modern Uncategorised Volume 13

The Relationship between Race and Rank During the First World War

By Steph Ritson The First World War is celebrated as the first globalised war, however, the experience and contributions of non-Europeans remain sidelined. The First World War saw the increased use of colonial troops, as well as the implementation of Charles Mangin’s ‘martial hierarchy’. This advocated an ideology of difference through the segregation and subordination …

Modern Volume 13

Equal Sporting Chance? How Sport Creates, Continues and Challenges Racism

By Ellie Marlow Recent events have drawn attention to the marginalisation of non-white actors in history, driving calls for more inclusive historical coverage. The ignorance of historical and contemporary contributions by certain groups of society creates prejudiced and narrow narratives that perpetuate implicit bias and continue racism. Sports provide a valuable route to analyse why …

2019 - 2020 Modern Volume 12

“I fear I am not in my perfect mind”: Mental health and the perception of madness in Shakespearian England

By Hannah McCann In Shakespeare’s plays, ‘madness’ plagues many of the characters. It is thought that the work of John Hall, a physician and Shakespeare’s son-in-law, influenced the playwright’s depiction of mental illness to some degree.  Physicians could explain some mental illnesses by drawing on ancient ideas. The concept of the four humours, created by …

2019 - 2020 Modern Volume 12

The Idiots, Insane and Mad: How projections of mental illness in Indian lunatic asylums protected British imperialism.

By Shaye Mistry It becomes an almost impossible task to single out how colonial Britain saw mental health in a period of high colonialism. In the contemporary, however,  psychiatric science was by its very nature a by-product of colonialism. In India, traditional methods of healing and dealing with madness were common and available to the …

2019 - 2020 Modern Volume 12

The Importance of Teaching Colonial History to Tackle Contemporary Racism

By Rebecca Mason The Holocaust has been remembered in history as one of the most devastating atrocities on behalf of humanity. The large-scale and centrally coordinated genocidal attack on minority groups, mostly constituting of Jews, possesses the largest magnitude of deaths in history. Yet, the many other acts of genocides that were of consistent occurrence …